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    Here I am paying full price for things like a chump. Clearly, I need to add a bunch of stuff to my cart and then walk away. Two emails later -> BAAM significant discount.

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      You’d be surprised how often it works exactly like that. Many software applications use this strategy too. I recently trialled a productivity tool. Didn’t like it so I let the trial expire. And over the last couple of days I’ve been getting emails with higher and higher discounts… That’s one reason why I advocate to stop after the second discount. Otherwise you run at the risk of giving the stuff for nothing.

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        I’m torn on this. For physical products I think this makes total sense. But for software and (god forbid) SaaS, i suspect you’ll end up getting a bunch of customers that are hard to support and waste all of your time.

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          Similarly, I offered my book with a 25% discount for the first day to drive sales, but I don’t want to train my audience to expect discounts. I think in the future the launch promotion will be a time-limited offer to join a webinar, receive an extra appendix, etc.

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            I totally agree. It’s a good strategy for eCommerce (if you want to recover those abandoned carts) but awful idea for SaaS. But as said, I'mc seeing one such company doing it right now. And I tell you this, seeing those emails had devalued their offering for me. This never happens if I get a discount from an online store.